THE LAW OF GIVING (1) - Acts 8:18-21

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One of the ruling principles in God's kingdom is giving. There are two kinds of giving; giving upwards and giving downwards. Giving upwards is giving into a ‘manifested grace’ so as to draw that grace into your life and be blessed – this however raises the question, “Can one buy grace?” No! There is no way you can give enough money to buy grace, but you can connect to grace by an act of giving.

In Acts 8:18-21, Simon, the sorcerer saw the apostles laying hands on the Believers at Samaria and they received the Holy Ghost. He wanted the same ability and offered them money to buy the power of the Holy Ghost. He said, "Give me also this power, that on whomsoever I lay hands, he may receive the Holy Ghost.” But Peter said, "Thy money perish with thee, because thou hast thought that the gift of God may be purchased with money.”

He was not born-again nor was he a member of the kingdom. He was an occultist that was used to power and was looking for more power to add to his power. Everybody practices giving; but what is motivating each person is different.  When you give to a manifested grace, that grace can come upon your life and you can be blessed. 

Giving downwards is giving towards a ‘manifested need,’ so as to express God’s blessing on you by being a blessing to someone else.

 

PRAYER: Father, I activate the laws of giving correctly to draw grace into my life, so I can be a blessing to my world.

 

BIBLE IN ONE YEAR: Isaiah 41:17-43:13, Ephesians 2:1-22, Psalms 67:1-7, Proverbs 23:29-35.

 


 


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